Prostate Cancer and PTSD

I have prostate cancer and I’ve had PTSD, but in my case, the two aren’t linked, but they can be. Although my cancer diagnosis petrified me, and I get stats angst every time I have a PSA check I’d never considered that cancer might cause PTSD. My brush with post traumatic stress disorder happened more than twenty years ago, long before I’d heard of radiotherapy, hormone therapy, prostatectomy and the other ugly words associated with our condition.

My brush with post traumatic stress disorder

I was fit and healthy, in my forties, and working for ABC News who had a habit of sending us to places where guns, bombs, and bullets were in plentiful supply. If you worked for American TV, particularly in the 90s, then more than likely you’d be chasing the Marines all over the globe. I did time in Sarajevo during the Bosnian conflict, was in Mogadishu when Bush senior sent in the troops and did a stint in DR Congo and Rwanda during the genocide, all places guaranteed to set your nerves on edge. Read on.

With Prostate Cancer, You Need To Think Like A Reporter

With Prostate Cancer, you need to think like a reporter. Being in and around the news business for most of my career it comes naturally for me to ask questions and with prostate cancer, questions are your friends.

I take a degree of comfort in knowing as much about the nature of my cancer, the treatment involved, and the possibility of a cure (always nervous of using that word) or getting to a place where there is no evidence of disease. I’m a firm believer that knowledge is power and while knowledge won’t cure your cancer it at least puts you in the driving seat.

Not everyone feels comfortable asking questions of doctors about a subject they probably have little knowledge and there are others who just want to leave decisions and actions in the hands of the medics and not probe too deeply. That’s not how I operate.

Read on.

The cancer trees

When I was diagnosed with prostate cancer just over two years ago, I remember taking the dog for a walk in our local park. Truth to tell I was feeling pretty down and not a little sorry for myself. Anyone reading this who is unlucky enough to be part of the cancer crew will know the early weeks after diagnosis are a tricky time. Suddenly your life is not only upended, but there seems a very real prospect of it being actually ended.

Coming to terms with stage IV cancer

Over the years we’ve all inevitably accrued inaccurate or just plain false facts about cancer. Different cancers respond in very different ways to treatment, some really are a death sentence while others can be treated very successfully. I soon learnt my cancer was stage four and as everybody knows there’s no stage five. Did this mean I was already in the departure lounge on journey I had no interest in taking? Read on…

Bedside Manner from Hell

Perhaps the doctor with the worst bedside manner ever was also thankfully fictional. Step forward Dr. Gregory House star of the long-running TV drama House. He was played by actor Hugh Laurie as a brilliant diagnostician with the bedside manner of Atilla the Hun. A drug addict, liar, and cheat, he cared nothing for the feelings of his patients or friends. No wonder the show was so fantastically popular. Read on…

Cancer at Christmas

The expectations are high on the part of everyone to have a good time. Friends are gathered, food is shared, and presents unwrapped. Then of course there are the songs: Have Yourself a Merry Little ChristmasI’m Dreaming of a White Christmas or my particular favourite Ella Fitzgerald singing The Christmas Song. And how can you fail with Bing Crosby or Frank Sinatra? They all celebrate the holidays, but often with a sense of yearning. Click here to read on.

I’ve hit rock bottom (and everyone’s cheering)

I’ve just had some pretty good news and that’s what all the cheering is about, but it needs a little context, so bear with me.

I celebrated my 65th birthday a couple of weeks back. My wife and I threw quite a party and whooped it up with as many old and new friends as we could muster.

I was lucky enough to assemble a magnificent band mostly made up of friends from my days in the music business. I still play guitar and sing when the mood takes me, and it certainly took me that night. Even though most of the band were my friends I firmly believe that musicians should get paid for playing so I gave all of them a small sum of money to say thank you. They tried to refuse but I said take it and why not give it to a prostate cancer charity. Read on…

Rod ‘n’ Elton

Celebrities talking about prostate cancer can only help boost awareness.

They became close friends in the early seventies just as fame beckoned and bonded over a love of music, football, and partying. It’s sometimes been a fractious friendship, but it remains one to this day. It’s a fifty-year story of two music legends who share many milestones. If you haven’t guessed, I’m talking about Rod Stewart and Elton John. Read on…

September, say do you remember?

September is tremendously important and not just because it’s the title of perhaps the best song ever recorded by the magisterial Earth Wind and Fire. Yes, I know others will argue for Boogie Wonderland, but September suits my purpose right now.

For those who don’t know, September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Eyes glaze over, man keeps scrolling. Wait, not so fast…

Read on: https://prostatecancer.net/living/september-screening-awareness/